Sex and Relationships Education

People often only hear the word sex and they need to remember that education is about relationships too. Love and relationships one of the most important things in our lives and it is crucial to our health and wellbeing to be surrounded by people we love and about whom we care. Many people are in unfulfilling, dysfunctional and even abusive relationships and one can’t help wondering if the paucity and poor quality of SRE up till now is largely responsible.
In the light of this, we at Schools OUT UK welcome the overdue review of Sex and Relationships Education and the commitment to making it mandatory in schools and inclusive of LGBT+ people. We also welcome the public consultation announced on Wednesday. We very much hope to be a part of the consultation. Our position is set out below.

New Schools Guide for LGBT+ Parents

The first resource of its kind, Inclusion Matters provides background on English state and independent schools’ statutory obligations under the Equality Act 2010 and explains how these schools are formally assessed on diversity by Ofsted and the Independent Schools Inspectorate. The guide shows how case law supports parents and carers having a voice in shaping a school’s commitment to diversity.

NUT Prevalence of Homophobia Survey Report

This Prevalence of Homophobia survey was born out of the experiences of one secondary classroom teacher who was the subject of repeated physical and verbal abuse over a number of years.

This survey is then the product of a lot of hard work by a large number of people over a number of years together the thousands of classroom teachers who took time from their impossible workloads to complete the questionnaire all of whom I congratulate and offer my sincere thanks.

A Resources special: Equality – Still out of sight and out of mind

Schools must tackle homophobic bullying as forcefully as they do other forms of discrimination, says Elizabeth Bridges*

For anyone who works in a school, bullying is an unfortunate reality. From comments about weight to remarks about ethnicity or disability, pupils – and some teachers – can be cruel and thoughtless.